NonFiction November: Random Edition

Last but not least we have a hodgepodge of topics that just happened to interest me.

You’re the Only One I Can Tell: Inside the Language of Women’s Friendships by Deborah Tannen

Ever since I read Text Me When You Get Home by Kayleen Schaefer I’ve been fascinated with the idea of female friendship and how they’re portrayed as opposed to how we actually act. Tannen is a linguist so is focused on what we say and how we say it. I’m definitely interested to see if there’s anything there.

Girl Talk: What Science can tell us About Female Friendship by Jacqueline Mroz

Same topic, different perspective. Mroz is interested in the sociology and science behind female friendship. I wasn’t aware of scientific studies being conducted on this topic and I also am curious with this title and the last if we are including trans women along with cis. I have a feeling there’s not going to be a lot of inclusion here unfortunately.

Garlic and Sapphires: The Secret Life of a Critic in Disguise by Ruth Reichl

As I turn back to cooking more (our last kitchen was abysmal and I did the bare minimum), I am also rediscovering my love of food essay collections. We as humans have such a varied relationship with food and I hear Reichl is one of the best food writers. I’m super excited to get to this (even if it takes me until the end of the year to read it).

How to Write an Autobiographical Novel by Alexander Chee

Chee’s The Queen of the Night was nothing short of phenomenal. I have heard nothing but amazing things about this essay collection as well. Chee has a gift with words and has a lot to share with readers. I’m still kicking myself it’s taken me this long to actually get to reading it.

Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language by Gretchen McCulloch

I listened to this on audiobook and it’s so very good. I am fascinated with language and how it evolves and changes. This is a great conversation on what the impact the internet has had on us. McCulloch does a wonderful job on both the information and the narration. This is definitely one of my top picks of the year for nonfiction.

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