Bout of Books 27: Day 3

No challenge today. well technically there was, but it’s one looking for recommendations and 1) I don’t need recommendations at the moment and 2) it’s meant for their comments section. So let’s get on with the update!

I finished Daisy Jones and the Six. It was so good. I got so stuck in genre last year that I barely made a dent in anything else. I had so many people tell me how good it was. I will admit for the longest time, I thought it was a nonfiction about some band I’d never heard of (let’s be real. I don’t know about a lot of bands so this wasn’t that surprising). It was told in the style of an oral history that really added to the story. It was way more fun to follow the band’s journey with the back and forth of all the members and the people around them. I give it 5 stars for sure.

Fuck yes, Daisy.

I also finished Nevernight, my read along book. According to Goodreads it was my 3rd reread of it and I still love it. Jay Kristoff is a sneaky sadist shit and I love him. I don’t say that lightly. There aren’t very many cis straight white authors who can entertain me the way he does (maybe Nicholas Eames).

Total pages read: 357. Not bad. I mean, it’s nothing compared to the previous day, but to be fair yesterday I was battling some wicked allergies so I’m content with what I did accomplish.

How’s your Bout of Books going? What are you reading?

SFF Shenanigans with Jessica and Karena

My friend Jessica and I are going to be tackling Hodderscape’s 2019 challenge but in 2020. You will be seeing posts from her as we’ve decided to tackle our book selections together. Here is the list we’re planning on reading for the year.

A book based on mythology or folkloreThe Sisters GrimmMerena van Praag
A non-fiction book by a SFF authorBroken Places and Outer SpacesNnedi Okorafor
A work of sci-fi or fantasy in translationThus Were Their FacesSilvia Ocampo
A book being adapted for movie or TV in 2019/2020TBD
A novel featuring dragonsTurning Darkness into LightMarie Brennan
A work of sci-fi by a woman or non-binary authorChilling EffectValerie Valdes
A book told from multiple character POVsDocileK.M. Szpara
A book with a non-human protagonistThe City We BecameN.K. Jemisin
A retelling of a classic fairytaleGirls Made of Snow and GlassMelissa Bashardoust
A book set in a dystopian futureRiot BabyTochi Onyebuchi
A book set on a different planet or space stationA Memory Called EmpireArkady Martine
A book inspired by real-world historyCreatures of Want and RuinMolly Tanzer

Our first book for January is going to be A Memory Called Empire. It’s on the longer side so we are going to start out strong. It’s a space opera where most of the characters are queer. Huzzah! I also found this article on Strange Horizons with the author Arkady Martine which was pretty fascinating. Jessica and I will report back at the end of January with our thoughts. Also if you’re interested in following along, we’ll be using the hashtag #JKShenanigansSFF

Do you have any suggestions for 2019/2020 adaptions? Let us know in the comments. We are trying to veer away from the straight cis white dudes if possible.

Bout of Books 27: Day 2

Share Your 2020 Reading Goals is today’s Bout of Books’ challenge. Well. My husband has been badgering me for awhile and this year since i’m not currently working, I decided to try it. I’m going for 365. I’ve gotten close to it before. In 2016, I managed 350, so it’s possible! The trick is making sure my books are not just white lady historical romance novels as that’s the easiest way for me to consume books.

Also how did my first day go you ask? I’m pretty chuffed to be honest. I managed to catch up with Jessica (you’ll be meeting her soon) on our Nevernight readalong and finished 81 pages. Then even though I was only supposed to read 9 chapters of Lonesome Dove, I got hooked and ended up reading 41 chapters which amounts to 287 pages. I meant to finish Daisy Jones and the Six, but then my youngest spawn asked to watch a couple episodes of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and who am I to say no? Especially since one of those episodes is The Wish and not only do we meet Anya, but we also get Vampire Willow and…I digress. I did manage 94 pages of Daisy Jones so it wasn’t a complete wash. The only negative is I didn’t finish a book so according to Goodreads, I’m behind.

Today’s plan? Well, depending on where my friend gets with Nevernight, I may or may not finish that. Definitely Daisy Jones will be finished. I also need to start A Memory Called Empire for the SFF Challenge.

How did your first day go? What are your plans with your second?

Bout of Books 27: Day 1

Today’s challenge I think is supposed to be just a twitter challenge, but here we are. Introduce yourself in six words: High volume reader with snarky opinions. Now for those of you who have been around, you know. But for anyone finding me through the readathon: Welcome!

I read a lot. Like a lot a lot. I average around 300 books a year, give or take. I mostly can be found in either the romance or science fiction/fantasy sections respectively, but also foray into feminist studies, biographies, essay collections, and the occasional history aisles as well. I was a bookseller in California for nigh 3 years and now live in Pennsylvania where I’m focusing more on writing. Writing what? I am not sure, but we’re gonna see where it goes.

The books on the docket this week are mostly going to be from my reading challenges that I’ve decided to partake in. We have Lonesome Dove for my #covenbookchallenge and A Memory Called Empire for the SFF challenge created by Hodderscape. I also am buddy reading Nevernight with my cohort Jessica. It’s a reread for me and I’m pacing myself to her and it’s letting me take more time with the characters than I have before. I ❤ Mia. I probably will also indulge in a few romance novels. Not sure which ones yet.

If you’re participating in Bout of Books, what do you have planned for your first day? Also link your blogs!

Bout of Books 27 Edition

It’s that time of year again and what a way to jump into all of our new reading goals. It’s time for Bout of Books 27. What is Bout of Books you’re asking? Well, I’ve done it before, but here’s a recap.

The Bout of Books read-a-thon is organized by Amanda Shofner and Kelly Rubidoux Apple. It is a week long read-a-thon that begins 12:01am Monday, January 6th and runs through Sunday, January 12th in whatever time zone you are in. Bout of Books is low-pressure. There are challenges, Twitter chats, and a grand prize, but all of these are completely optional. For all Bout of Books 27 information and updates, be sure to visit the Bout of Books blog. – From the Bout of Books team

I have gone over great reading strategies in the past. This time I think I’m not really going for quantity, but using it to spend time on the books for my reading challenges. Lonesome Dove and its nearly 900 pages is not going to read itself. As it gets closer I’ll let you know more of what might be happening.

Are you participating? Link your blog so I can cheer you on!

#CovenBookChallenge 2020

I read a lot but sometimes often I get stuck in the same reading rut. Luckily a couple of my fellow book coven members worked up a special spell to counter this curse. 24 books in 12 months all in very specific categories, some from the pretty simple (books with a rainbow color in the title) to the complex (books published by a non profit press). I can’t claim any credit for this graphic! One of my awesome coven co-members did and it’s so awesome. I’m also doing Hodderscape’s 2019 challenge which you can read about here.

I have all but 3 books chosen although these are subject to change because things happen. I’m a bit hesitant to announce what they are at the moment. Also if you’re interested in following along, we’re using #CovenBookChallenge.

My plan is to read 2 books a month. I think I’m starting with the Pulitzer Prize and is a favorite of a friend or family member categories, respectively.

Lonesome Dove won the Pulitzer Prize in 1986. Why this tome of a Western? A few reasons. I have heard from people I generally trust in books, that it’s pretty good. A former coworker of mine and her husband even changed their last name when they got married because of their love for this book. The nearly 950 pages is a bit terrifying but I think it’s going to be a solid start for the new year.

My book coven loves Murderbot so very much. There isn’t a book poll that doesn’t happen without All Systems Red being one of the answers, even if it wasn’t up for consideration in the first place. I even named my phone Murderbot even though I haven’t read it because it sounded so good. Now with a full length novel coming later this year, I’m thinking it’s finally time. And since it’s a novella it will pair perfectly with the brick that is Lonesome Dove.

Are you doing any reading challenges this year? Tell me which ones in the comments.

The End of the Year Book Tag 2019

I have a great support system when it comes to my books and reading and when one of my coven suggested we do an end of the year book tag, I was thrilled.

1. Are there any books you started this year that you need to finish?

With the move this summer I started and abandoned a lot of books. Not on purpose. It just happened. I got a few of them finished with Nonfiction November, but there are still some fiction titles out there. And then there are a few titles like Harrow the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir that I had to put down because my brain wasn’t being able to handle the mindfuckery she was putting me through at the time.

2. Do you have an autumnal book to transition into the end of the year?

Not really. I’m just looking to finish a few that I already started and some stragglers that I didn’t get to with Nonfiction November.

3. Is there a new release you’re still waiting for?

No, I think thanks to access to Advanced Reader Copies I’ve read all the things I was super excited about already.

4. What are three books you want to read before the end of the year?

The aforementioned Harrow the Ninth for sure. Alisha Rai’s Girl Gone Viral. And I’m cheating on this because it’s a series, but Sarah Kozloff’s The Nine Realms series. It’s meant to be binged so I have 3 books to finish.

5. Is there a book you think could still shock you and become your favorite book of the year?

Doubtful. This was a year of Middlegame, Gideon the Ninth, The Starless Sea, The Ten Thousand Doors of January and those were just the SFF titles I loved.

6. Have you already started making reading plans for 2020?

I’m definitely going to hit my Goodreads goal which was 300 books (at the time of writing this I’m at 292 out of 300), and next year my husband challenged me to try for 365. At the moment I’m not working so maybe this is something I can accomplish.

stack of books in front of a fireplace with the text Nonfiction November

NonFiction November: Random Edition

Last but not least we have a hodgepodge of topics that just happened to interest me.

You’re the Only One I Can Tell: Inside the Language of Women’s Friendships by Deborah Tannen

Ever since I read Text Me When You Get Home by Kayleen Schaefer I’ve been fascinated with the idea of female friendship and how they’re portrayed as opposed to how we actually act. Tannen is a linguist so is focused on what we say and how we say it. I’m definitely interested to see if there’s anything there.

Girl Talk: What Science can tell us About Female Friendship by Jacqueline Mroz

Same topic, different perspective. Mroz is interested in the sociology and science behind female friendship. I wasn’t aware of scientific studies being conducted on this topic and I also am curious with this title and the last if we are including trans women along with cis. I have a feeling there’s not going to be a lot of inclusion here unfortunately.

Garlic and Sapphires: The Secret Life of a Critic in Disguise by Ruth Reichl

As I turn back to cooking more (our last kitchen was abysmal and I did the bare minimum), I am also rediscovering my love of food essay collections. We as humans have such a varied relationship with food and I hear Reichl is one of the best food writers. I’m super excited to get to this (even if it takes me until the end of the year to read it).

How to Write an Autobiographical Novel by Alexander Chee

Chee’s The Queen of the Night was nothing short of phenomenal. I have heard nothing but amazing things about this essay collection as well. Chee has a gift with words and has a lot to share with readers. I’m still kicking myself it’s taken me this long to actually get to reading it.

Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language by Gretchen McCulloch

I listened to this on audiobook and it’s so very good. I am fascinated with language and how it evolves and changes. This is a great conversation on what the impact the internet has had on us. McCulloch does a wonderful job on both the information and the narration. This is definitely one of my top picks of the year for nonfiction.

NonFiction November: Romance History

I have been meaning to get to these forever it feels like. As someone who found romance novels at 15, they’ve always been a part of my reading life. It was not until I was older that I found out people shunned them. Why? We talk about love all the time (there’s a whole industry making bank on it, from dating apps to the wedding complex), but we don’t want to read stories about it? Weird. These titles were recommended to me to better educate myself on why romance is such an important genre.

This Week’s Topic: The History and Sociology of Romance

Everything I know about Love I Learned from Romance Novels by Sarah Wendell

This one is tricky. The only romances mentioned are largely by and about het white ladies (with Courtney Milan being the only exception as a bi woman of color) and even then, the same are repeated. It shows a very specific time in romance so maybe you’ll find it interesting.

Beyond Heaving Bosoms: The Smart Bitches’ Guide to Romance Novels by Sarah Wendell and Candy Tan

Another by Sarah Wendell and I believe comes first. I haven’t gotten to it yet, but the previous selection makes me seriously nervous. I hope the examples given are more than just Jennifer Crusie’s Bet Me (which is fantastic, don’t get me wrong) and Tessa Dare. I don’t have problems with those authors, but where’s Beverly Jenkins for example?

A Natural History of the Romance Novel by Pamela Regis

Published in 2007 this isn’t going to take into account the current state of romance including the rise of marginalized voices being more prevalent, but it sounds like it’s a good look at romance’s beginnings and middle.

Dangerous Books for Girls: The Bad Reputation of Romance Novels Explained by Maya Rodale

Rodale is one of my favorite romance writers (ask me about Duchess by Design. Sigh) and this book was actually her master’s thesis. I’ve read the first couple chapters, one of which discusses how irritating it is that most people know romance because of a dude. You know the one. Long hair, muscle–y, got smacked in the face with a bird while on a roller coaster.

Women and Romance: a Reader edited by Susan Ostrov Weisser

This one I’m a little wary of. While it was on a list of nonfiction about the romance genre, I have no idea what stance it’s taking because on Goodreads there’s only one written review. It happened to come through my store’s used desk so I snatched it up. I’ll be sure to report back.

Does anyone have a more recent addition to add? Rodale’s was published in 2011 making it the most up to date, but especially in the last few years, giant strides have been made in romance to make it more inclusive (albeit it struggles still as evident in the recent AAR debacle among other events).

stack of books in front of a fireplace with the text Nonfiction November

NonFiction November: History

Here we are in week 3 of Nonfiction November. This week we’re going to History Class. We’re going to cover a socialite librarian with a secret, Britain’s Regency period, ancient queens, Victorian childrearing, a lesbian landowner in the 1800s, and the creation of Jell-O. I have very wild taste, friends.

Today’s topic: History

An Illuminated Life: Belle da Costa Greene’s Journey from Prejudice to Privilege by Heidi Ardizzone

I’ll be honest. I started this in 2017 and never finished it. Life happened and I really want to finish it. It’s top of the list on purpose. I heard about Greene on a podcast and she fascinated me. Belle da Costa Green lived quite the life and I mean to learn about it.

The Regency Years: During Which Jane Austin Writes, Napoleon Fights, Byron Makes Love and Britain Becomes Modern by Robert Morris

Another that I started (although this one’s more recently during the move) and really would like to finish. I hold a fierce fascination for this era, exclusively because of romance novels so this is way in my wheelhouse.

When Women Ruled the World: Six Egyptian Queens by Kara Cooney

Ever since they taught us about Ancient Egypt in 6th grade I was hooked. Cooney’s The Woman Who Would Be King was well researched, yet made sure the reader was entertained. I decided on the audio this time and was not disappointed. Cooney is engaging and knowledgable and I can’t wait to see what she comes up with next.

Ungovernable: The Victorian Parent’s Guide to Raising Flawless Children by Therese Oneill

I really enjoyed Oneill’s Unmentionables so when I heard the next was going to be on the raising of Victorian children, I was interested. Unfortunately, I was less than thrilled. The Q&A style didn’t quite come through in my opinion. But the photos and captions are great.

Gentleman Jack: The Real Anne Lister by Anne Choma

Queer people have always existed. Unfortunately they don’t always get to live their truth which is why it’s so amazing that we actually have Anne Lister’s diaries detailing her life. She was not a perfect person (pretty much a rich landowner who gave zero fucks about her tenants), but problematic queer people also need to be recognized.

Jell-o Girls: A Family History by Allie Rowbottom

This is the only title on the list that I’m like “why did I add this?” Then I think about how at my grandparents’ 50th anniversary they made sure to have Jell-O as a dessert for the grandkids, and how we would make Jigglers like they were something fancy (I was a poor kid in the 80s, they were fancy af) and realize Jell-O is nostalgic and comfort.

Are you reading any good history books? Share them with me!