Acquired ARCs for the Week of September 8th

…I’d love to tell you that I’ve read nine million books this week so I’ve acquired ten million, but that’s not the case. I got caught up in this Sims 4 decades legacy challenge which is a blog post in itself (but maybe not this blog) so reading has gone slowly. Let’s see what’s been picked up, however.

Netgalley

The Seduction of of Lady Phoebe by Ella Quinn

I’m reading this right now. I’m a fan of Quinn’s Worthington series (not to be confused with Celeste Bradley’s Wicked Worthington series, which I do all the time) and this looks to be a reissue. I haven’t read it though so fun times. This seems to be one of those rarities where the male MC is in love with the heroine right from the start, except…he makes a cake of himself and has to fix his approach…eight years later.

Pub date: October 29, 2019

The Highlander’s Christmas Bride by Vanessa Kell

I…usually am not a fan of seasonal tales (although where are my Halloween ones??? I want autumn walks through the leaves), but Vanessa Kelly is one of those authors I’ll make exceptions for. Here we have a failed nun (probably a chapter title in my memoir, to be honest) and the Highlander sent to escort her home. This is bound to go well.

Pub date: October 29. 2019

Edelweiss

The Glass Magician by Caroline Stevermer

Tor. Do you have spies in my house? I’m guessing yes. Consistently they put out books that speak to my soul (Hi Gideon the Ninth). Also let’s talk about that cover. There’s so much too unpack: skull, swan, eyes…Our story takes place in Gilded Age New York and wow, this looks amazing. I think I’m gonna have to switch up my TBR a bit and move this one up the list. I have high hopes for it.

Pub date: April 7, 2020

The Cerulean Queen by Sarah Kozloff

…Tor. This is the conclusion to A Queen in Hiding which is strange because the books between the first and the last aren’t available as ARCs yet. However,  I’m absolutely intrigued by the concept Kozloff and Tor are about. Each book in the series is being published one month after another, which is unheard of. It’s kind of a Netflix binge. I enjoyed the first in the series and I’m definitely interested to see where we go. *

Pub date: April 21, 2020

Forever and a Duke by Olivia Drake

Did I pick this up because the dude MC has my maiden name? No. Was I pretty thrilled that an author I enjoy used my maiden name? Yes. Here we have a duke who needs a bride and an American who does not, under any circumstance, need a duke. This lady has shit to do, and he ain’t one of them. I’m always here for when the menfolk have to win over the ladies and aren’t all “love is for losers.”

Pub date: December 21, 2019

Docile by K.M Szpara

Tor. We get it. You’re the cool kid at the table. Fine. I’ll sit with you. Stop begging. I’ve heard sooo many things about this book. All of them good. As soon as I saw it was up for download, I jumped on it with the quickness. See that Charlie Jane blurb? Also Sarah Gailey is into it. The premise sounds terrifying. Having to sell yourself to pay off parental debt? I’m gonna need a lot of fun, squishy books after this. I can feel it.

Pub date: March 3, 2020

That’s it for me this week. Did any of these make your TBR? Have your own acquired ARCs you want to share with the class? Let me know in the comments.

*Updated to correct series order error.

Acquired ARCs for the Week of September 2nd

I’ve been battling a cold, but luckily that gives me even more time to read and pick up ARCs. In this week’s news Kensington must have just gotten tired of pushing that approval button on Netgalley so much because they granted me the coveted “Auto approval” which means any books they have up on the site, I just get to download it without asking permission. Very exciting. Speaking of Netgalley, we’ll start with them.

Netgalley

The Merry Viscount by Sally MacKenzie

Last year I got a good chunk of my non romance reading bookseller coworkers to read What Ales the Earl by MacKenzie and it was a hit so when I saw the next in the series was available…the clicking was so fast. I read it in one sitting, it’s on the shorter side, but wow. So spicy. It’s a little of an insta-love trope, but it works. I had a good time.

 

Pub date: September 24, 2019

 

Blitzed by Alexa Martin

This is the third in Martin’s Playbook series. While I generally don’t read any sports romances, this series has charmed the hell out of me. Brynn, our main character, has been in the last two books as a side character and I’m really glad to see more of her in this one. Martin writes from a bit of experience in the field (hahahaha. nope I’m not sorry) as she is the wife of a former NFL player. This one is bound to be a good time.

Pub date: December 3, 2019

 

A Jewel Bright Sea by Claire O’Dell

I’ve been reading O’Dell’s Janet Watson series which is a twist on the Holmes canon by making both Sherlock and Watson black queer women and have really enjoyed it so seeing that she had something new on the horizon sparked my interest. This seems to be a heist fantasy which is definitely in my Venn diagram of read it now.  Good news, it’s already out so you can pick it up as well!

Pub date: September 3, 2019

 

Edelweiss

The Silvered Serpents by Roshani Chokshi

Right after I finished last week’s post, this beauty came up on my Edelweiss. It’s the second book in the Gilded Wolves series which is a YA heist fantasy (remember what I said about heist fantasies) and the first was one of my favorite books of last year. I’m excited to see what the gang is up to. This read very crossover to me, great for YA readers and great for adult SFF readers who have read everything.

Pub date: February 4, 2020

 

The Prince of Broadway by Joanna Shupe

This is the second in Shupe’s Uptown Girls series and it takes place in Gilded Age NYC. I usually stay on the other side of the pond in this era, but I’ve read Shupe and a couple others and I must say, I might have been missing out. Also he’s the owner of a casino which in Regency would be a hell and hello, I’m listening. Bad boy meets rich girl trope has become a weakness as well, I firmly blame Sarah MacLean. She’s probably cackling right now

Pub date: December 30, 2019

 

That’s it for this week. What did you pick up this week? Share your literary loot in the comments.

 

 

 

 

Acquired ARCs Week of August 19th

While I was a bookseller I became a front list addict. Rereading? Only for my truest love The Night Circus. If it wasn’t brand new, I didn’t read it. To be honest, if it was already out, I probably skipped it. I lived on Edelweiss and in the book buyer’s office, scoping all the Advanced Reader Copies (ARCs). A bit has changed now that I’m on hiatus. I’ve done a few romance series rereads like Julia Quinn’s The Bridgerton series to prep for the show and as I’ve mentioned lately I’ve been going through some of those ARCs I never got to through the Bout of Books readathon. But honestly, I’m still front list at heart and luckily the blog gives me a reason to read ahead as it were. Let’s see a few titles I picked up this week.

Netgalley

This Earl of Mine by Kate Bateman 

This is the first in a new series by Bateman. I haven’t read her before so I’m excited. Folks, this is a second chance romance with a marriage of convenience which is catnip for me. Heiress marries a condemned prisoner to save her fortune from a villainous cousin only to find out…hubby was actually working undercover. Now what? I don’t know, but I’m super excited to find out

Pub date: October 29, 2019

 

 

Lady Hotspur by Tessa Gratton

I really liked The Queens of Innis Lear which was a spin on Shakespeare’s King Lear so I’ve been waiting for something new from Gratton. Lady Hotspur is a retelling of The Bard’s Henry IV and takes place in the same world as her first book which fascinates me. We get to follow a fallen queen, a knight turned heir to the throne, and a weapon of warfare who is caught between them both. There seems to be a queer subplot which I am super down for.

Pub date: January 7, 2020 

 

The Throne of the Five Winds by S.C. Emmett

I didn’t know this when I requested it, but S.C. Emmett is a pseudonym for Lilith Saintcrow. I’ve read a few of her urban fantasy series back in the day, but it was so long ago, I couldn’t’ tell you why I stopped. Goodreads tells me this is an East Asia inspired epic fantasy following two queens, two concubines, and six princes. I like a good court intrigue so I’m…interested.  This is the first installment of a trilogy according to the Orbit announcement.

Pub date: October 15, 2019

 

Unnatural Magic by C.M. Waggoner

This debut novel was blurbed by one of my favorite authors, Kat Howard and also can we talk about how gorgeous this cover is? The main characters are a would-be mage and a troll who are investigating troll murders. This is not something I’ve seen before and I really can’t wait to jump in and see where Waggoner takes us.

Pub date: November 5, 2019

 

 

Edelweiss 

Engaged to the Earl by Lisa Berne

Engaged to the Earl is the fourth in the Penhallow Dynasty series which I have been reading and enjoying. Not sure what our trope is in this one yet from the description. Whatever the official one is for dude leaves to find adventure, comes back to find dreamy girl has grown the fuck up and looking gorgeous. Also she’s engaged so she’s gonna have to pick between the guy everyone likes and the guy no one’s heard from in years. What’s a girl to do?

Pub date: February 25, 2019

 

 

Something That May Shock and Discredit You by Daniel Mallory Ortberg

I read Ortberg when he ran The Toast and his book Texts From Jane Eyre but was too scared to read The Merry Spinster although one of my horror loving friends adored it. I’m a sucker for a good essay collection and this one sounds like it’s going to be a lot of fun. Pop culture is where Ortberg excels and I expect this to be a good time.

Pub date: January 28, 2019

 

What new books did you pick up this week? Is there anything you’re looking forward to reading this fall?

#24in48 Recommendations

Originally, I was going to do a post about what I’m reading for #24in48 which is happening this weekend (click the link for the deets), however, it turns out…the spawn are finally joining us in Pittsburgh that weekend so we will be running around showing them their new city. So I thought maybe I would help with some recommendations. I’m a bookseller on hiatus, it’s the least I can do. As I’ve mentioned before, I don’t generally do a lot of my heavy reading for readathons, otherwise it’ll feel like I’m not making any progress so I’ll be keeping it nice and light (in page length anyway). I’m also going to keep it to more recent books since I haven’t really talked about anything newish in the last two years on here. And away we go!

Fiction

The Lady's Guide to Celestial Mechanics (Feminine Pursuits, #1)The Lady’s Guide to Celestial Mechanics by Olivia Wait

F/F Regency romance is sparse on the ground when it comes to the Big 5 publishers so when I heard about this story about an astronomer who falls for an explorer’s widow? I was basically the human realization of that Fry gif. This hit all the spots. Fiber art! Science! Sexy times! All the exclamation points.

 

 

 

 

Kingdom of Exiles (The Beast Charmer, #1)Kingdom of Exiles by Maxym M. Martineau

While we are on the topic of romance, let’s talk about this romance/fantasy. To be honest, I still can’t figure out if it’s Romance with a fantasy theme or Fantasy with a romance subplot. That’s not a knock. I really liked that way Martineau blended it. As a bookseller, I just didn’t know where to shelve it. Ha! Anyway, it is a fun start to a series that I’m seriously interested in seeing where it goes.

 

 

 

An Illusion of Thieves (Chimera, #1)An Illusion of Thieves by Cate Glass

Also the first in a new series, I had a good time with this fantasy novel about a royal courtesan who is exiled when her brother steals from the wrong person and now has to keep an eye on him. It’s not flashy magic, and there’s a found family aspect which I am a huge fan of.

 

 

 

 

MiddlegameMiddlegame by Seanan McGuire

What, you haven’t heard me screaming about this book already? I’ve been reading Seanan McGuire forever and she STILL BLOWS ME AWAY with this standalone about two people, Roger and Dodger who are unexplainably linked. The technical writing alone is fantabulous. Also do yourself a favor and listen to it on audio because Amber Benson narrates and she is amazeballs. It is on the longer side that I generally don’t recommend, but  the plot’s roller coaster will keep you going.

 

The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill SistersThe Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill Sisters by Balli Kaur Jaswal

If you loved Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows, you need Jaswal’s recent gift to the literary world (and if you haven’t read it, go do that one too). Three sisters are sent on a pilgrimage to India after their mother’s death. The catch? They don’t really see eye to eye. Themes of immigration, sisterhood, familial obligation, and culture are weaved together so beautifully here. It was one of the first books I read in 2019 and I’m still thinking about it.

 

Nonfiction

Southern Lady CodeSouthern Lady Code by Helen Ellis

Ellis’s short story collection American Housewife is my favorite recommendation for people who don’t like short stories. It’s amazing. And everything I love about it, Ellis puts in this essay collection (also great rec for people who don’t like essays. See what I did there?). This is the book to read for quick bites of wit and charm in equal measures.

 

 

Call Them by Their True Names: American Crises (and Essays)Call Them by Their True Names by Rebecca Solnit

Another great essay collection, but this time, less funny. Solnit is spot on with most of her observations and with the state of our nation at the moment (let’s be real, forever) this hits in the spot that tells you this is all fucked up and these are the reasons why that maybe you couldn’t name.

 

 

 

We're Going to Need More WineWe Are Going to Need More Wine by Gabrielle Union

I’m just going to say what I put down for IndieNext. Writing this off as another celebrity memoir is the worst mistake you can make in your reading life. Union has put together a collection of essays covering topics of race, feminism, beauty standards, and fame that truly touch the soul. I would recommend for fans of Roxane Gay and Phoebe Robinson, for her blunt truthfulness and heart. I thoroughly enjoyed reading every essay and would read anything she writes in the future. (TW: rape)

 

Believe Me: A Memoir of Love, Death, and Jazz ChickensBelieve Me: A Memoir of Love, Death and Jazz Chickens by Eddie Izzard

I am a huge fan of Eddie Izzard’s and have been since high school when I discovered Dress to Kill. I highly recommend the audio of this because of course I do. It’s Eddie. He talks about coming to terms with being transgender, a word he never applied to himself, his comedy career, his family, and everything in between. Then go watch all of his standup…after the readathon, of course.

 

 

Priestdaddy: A Memoir

Priestdaddy by Patricia Lockwood

Ending it with one more audiobook recommendation because Lockwood herself reads it and while a lot of authors can’t pull it off, Lockwood nails it. She does fantastic impressions of her family which is worth the price of the audiobook. She recounts the years where after her husband has some health problems they move in with her conservative parents. And oh boy, it’s a doozy. You need to read it to believe this kind of wild. You’ll laugh out loud on your commute and scare the crap out of that baby sleeping in their stroller. I’m sorry. But not really.

 

So that’s it, I mean, it’s not really it because if you know me, I have more recommendations where that came from, but these are a good start. If you want more, you know where to find me.

What are some books you are recommending for people’s #24in48 needs?

July Book Club Favorites

This month the Ladies Reading Speculative Fiction book club read Redwood and Wildfire by Andrea Hairston. We haven’t picked our August book yet so stay tuned!

Here’s what some of us enjoyed this month outside of our book club read.

Roses and Rot by Kat Howard. This hit all the right buttons for me: an artists’ colony on the edge of Faerie? Where do I sign up? Although, like any “true” tale of the Fae, that attractive idea is more of a snare than a treat. The voice of the novel manages to feel real and contemporary while weaving in all the peril and beauty of fairy tales. Excerpts of the main character’s own writing project insightfully explore the themes of those evergreen stories. Echoes of Tam Lin foreshadow the climactic struggle of artists from all disciplines competing to be good enough for the Fae. Anyone who has asked themselves why they work so hard to “make it” in the arts will understand the stakes. Add to the mix a “stage mom” worse than any stepmother, and a sister-love better than Anna and Elsa – Roses and Rot kept me enthralled. One of my top reads this year. –Juniper


Watership Down by Richard Adams. There’s a Seanan McGuire quote about Watership Down, which is roughly that it takes an extraordinary book and an extraordinary writer for a book about rabbits to be more reflective of the human condition than most books about humanity, and it’s completely spot-on. I’ve read this book so many times that I can’t even begin to count them all, and each time has been equally precious and important to me. There’s a tendency for people to look at Watership Down and think, “ah, a kids’ book about rabbits, this won’t be that rewarding,” and that tendency is incredibly unfortunate. Watership is one of the most rewarding books I’ve ever read, which is why I  keep coming back to it. It’s about rabbits, yes, and you can absolutely read it to your children. However, its success lies in things that appeal to ten-year-olds and fifty-year-olds alike: This is a story about danger, war, camaraderie, loyalty, death, and need. It’s about refugees setting up in new territory, being welcomed and rejected in turn, and figuring out how it is that they must live their lives in their new home. It leans heavily on the loyalty and love between those who leave home together and fight together to find a new place in the world, and it always returns to hope, joy in the smallest things in life, and the bonds between us. -Anie

As for me. I thoroughly enjoyed Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi. It was a heartbreaking story told in 300 years of one family from Ghana. I loved the changing POVs as it moved from one generation to the next. You get a sense of how each character saw themselves and how then they were perceived by their descendants as well as how their choices (and in some cases their lack of freedom to make choices) affect the next generation.

What were your favorite books of the month?

WWW Wednesdays 6/22

WWW Wednesday is a book meme run by Taking on a World of Words.

Every week I’m going to jump on here and talk about the week’s books. So let’s get to it shall we?

What are you currently reading? I just started The Geek Feminist Revolution  by Kameron Hurley which so far is pretty interesting. Remember, I love books about the arts so it should be no surprise I’m also into The Fifth Avenue Artists Society by Joy Calloway.

What did you recently finish reading? Last Call at the Nightshade Lounge by Paul Krueger was great. I have been a fan of urban fantasy for years and this was a great new addition to the genre. I had a lot of fun reading it and can’t wait to see where the series goes. I also finished We Were Feminists Once: From Riot Grrl to Covergirl, the Buying and Selling of a Political Movement by  Andi Heisler, which was enlightening. I think it is a must read for any feminist. Roses and Rot by Kat Howard rounds out my reads for this week. I haven’t been so pleased by a book in a long time. Howard’s prose was lovely and the story was engaging. It’s been a long time since I’ve read so many great books in a row. Hopefully it continues.

What do you think you’ll read next? I’m looking forward to reading Sweet bitter  by Stephanie Danler. I really love books about cooking and restaurants. I also need to start Redwood and Wildfire by Andrea Hairston for my book club pick.

What does your book life look like this week?

WWW Wednesdays 6/15

WWW Wednesday is a book meme run by Taking on a World of Words.

Every week I’m going to jump on here and talk about the week’s books. So let’s get to it shall we?

What are you currently reading? I’m currently reading The Crown’s Game by Evelyn Skye. I’m not loving it, but I’m not hating it. I admit to being a bit biased since the concept of the book is two magicians competing using their magic. Sounds a bit like The Night Circus and in my opinion, the latter did it with more imagery and heart. So far, I’m not feeling very interested in any of the characters. I’m disappointed because I wanted to love it. I’m also reading Last Call at the Nightshade Lounge by Paul Krueger. I’m only a few chapters in, but I’m really loving it. A Chinese-American protagonist, alcohol created superpowers, creepy things in the night? What’s not to love?

What did you recently finish reading? I finished a few recently. The Great 2016 Challenge has been working pretty well for me. The most recently finished was The Star-Touched Queen by Roshabi Chokshi, which I found to be really well written with lovely imagery and an engaging plot. I also read two sad books, What Lies Between Us by Naomi Munaweera and  An Unrestored Woman by Shobhaa Rao respectively. I expecting a sad read, but the content of that sadness was something I wasn’t ready for. I don’t want to give things away, just that these normally would be books I avoid. They were wonderfully written so I don’t want to dissuade anyone from reading it. It was just the subject matter. I have to say especially for An Unrestored Woman, I loved the way it was written as paired short stories. My main complaint with short stories is that I want more, this fulfilled that need. I also finished a nonfiction with Pistols and Petticoats: 175 Years of Lady Detectives in Fact and Fiction by Erika Janik. On the whole it was filled with a lot of cool facts and references, but it could have been so much better. It seemed to focus mostly on white ladies only and I think the author would have benefited from looking at comics as well for her examples of lady detectives. Especially to show the difference between the roles of the lady detectives in the beginning with the ones in modern times. Jessica Jones in comparison to Nancy Drew? Lots of food for thought there.

What do you think you’ll read next? Technically I’m kinda reading We Were Feminists Once: From Riot Grrl to Covergirl, the Buying and Selling of a Political Movement by  Andi Zeisler already, if you count I’ve read the introduction. I’m really interested to read the points about commercializing feminism. I love books about art in all of its forms so Roses and Rot by Kat Howard sounds like it’s totally in my wheelhouse.

What does your book life look like this week?

WWW Wednesdays 6/8

WWW Wednesday is a book meme run by Taking on a World of Words.

Every week I’m going to jump on here and talk about the week’s books. So let’s get to it shall we?

What are you currently reading? I’m continuing the great 2016 Hardback Challenge with What Lies Between Us by Naomi Munaweera and Pistols and Petticoats: 175 Years of Lady Detectives in Fact and Fiction by Erika Janik.

What did you recently finish reading? I just finished First Women: The Grace and Power of America’s Modern First Ladies by Kate Andersen Brower. I wasn’t overly thrilled with it. It came off super gossipy and sort of catty. Brower used a lot of anonymous sources saying one first lady said awful things about another first lady. The cattiness seemed to take up most of the book instead of really focus on the women themselves and their lives. Or she would use one First Lady’s faults to bump up another which is a serious no-no in my book. I also finished Before We Visit the Goddess, the latest by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni. I adored Mistress of Spices, Queen of Dreams, and Leaving Yuba City: Poems. When I reviewed it for Litsy, I kept going between Pick or So-So. It just felt a little underdeveloped for me, but on the whole I did enjoy it. I’m a big fan of mother/daughter stories.

What do you think you’ll read next? An Unrestored Woman, a debut novel by Shobha Rao that I picked up at the Bay Area Book Fest last weekend. The bookseller promised me a tragic story and it feels like I’m ready for one right now. Also for my fantasy needs, I’m going to read The Star-Touched Queen by Roshabi Chokshi. I have heard such wonderful things.

What does your book life look like this week?

The Great Read All My 2016 Hardbacks Before They Go to Paperback Challenge

I recently started a book budget (my spending on books got Shopaholic out of control), so I’ve made some ground rules on what books I do spend money on. I do buy ebooks from Amazon, mostly the ones on sale for $1.99. If I’m buying it in print for more than $15, I double check how long I’ve wanted it.

I noticed that some of the books I thought I wanted so badly that I bought them right away are now coming out in paperback, and that copy I bought? Still on my TBR bookcase. This isn’t saying anything about the books or their quality. Only that I am extremely fickle and get distracted by all the books. How can I fix this? It is ridiculously hard to keep up with all the books that are coming out, not to mention get too all the backlist books I missed along the way. I did pretty well recently clearing some of that backlist, so I thought maybe I should devote myself to reading these awesome front list books that I absolutely had to have. I declare it the Great 2016 Read My 2016 Hardbacks Before They Go to Paperback Challenge. Yes, usually it takes about a year for books to go to paperback, but you’ve seen my shelves (What?! you haven’t seen my shelves? You need to be following me on Instagram). There are a lot of books to get to. If I can clear this backlog then maybe it’ll be easier when new books come out. Are you laughing? Stop it. Of course I’m aware I’ll never be caught up, but a girl can dream, right?

Since I’ve taken up this challenge in the middle of May, I’ve read four (!) books that I owned in hardback. I’m working on Jane Steele by Lyndsey Faye currently.

Finished

TBR

Are there any books you really need to get to this summer?

May Book Club Favorites

This month the Ladies Reading Speculative Fiction book club read Ancient, Ancient by Kiini Ibura Salaam. Our next pick is Redwood and Wildfire by Andrea Hairston.

Here’s what the ladies enjoyed this month outside of our book club read.

Come as You Are: The Surprising Science That Will Transform Your Sex Life by Emily Nagoski. I can say that the subtitle is entirely apt. It sounds like a self-help book, but it’s more like a self-acceptance book – and that REALLY HELPS! We all tend to think we’re at least a little bit broken, so…just read this. And then gush about it to your partner. –Juniper



Fable” by Charles Yu. A few years ago I picked up Yu’s How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe on the recommendation of my friend Oliver. I’ve read a lot of science fiction and it’s rare that I read something truly surprising, but Yu’s novel was rich, complex, innovative, and heartfelt. So when I heard this week that Yu had a story in the New Yorker, I immediately went to check it out. “Fable” took my breath away. Yu deconstructs allegory in his stories. Instead of disguising the true content of his narratives, he presses the edges of them by meticulously unwinding the metaphorical veneer surrounding them, stitch by stitch. “Fable” is simultaneously a surreal and true-to-life tale about the nature of love, heartbreak, and family and how we work our way through it. He wields a plain, seemingly simplistic writing style defiantly, revealing the deeply moving story underneath. It’s well worth a read. –Clara

 


As for me. Binti by Nnedi Okorafor. I knew I loved Nnedi’s books after reading Who Fears Death and The Book of Phoenix, but Binti just made it even more so. I got to dish about it a lot during Bout of Books and was thrilled when someone read it on my recommendation and loved it. It’s a wonderful feeling. She’s also a favorite of the book club (we got to meet her when she came to speak at UCSC a couple months ago). Nnedi’s worldbuilding is so intricate, even in a less than 100 page novella. I can’t wait until January for book 2.

What were your favorite books of the month?